TRACK

Oxford and Nottingham

Category: cartography (page 2 of 2)

Back to the futurism

In 2009 in support of my initial M.A. proposal I wrote this statement….

Nothing much changed..:-)

amanesia

Shaun Belcher November 2009

ANAMNESIA

I am a somewhat unusual case to be writing about my ‘fine art’ practice. I began life ‘post-Hornsey College of Art’ in 1981 having successfully gained a place on the Royal College M.A. in Painting but sadly was not so successful in terms of funding. I continued as a painter and printmaker until a move to Edinburgh in 1993. There I became a published poet. A return to Oxford in 1996 then saw a period of fine art mixed with song-writing.

In conventional terms this kind of genre-hopping is frowned upon as not being quite serious enough. Thankfully I have enough USA based models to not worry too much about that e.g. Musician and Architect and Fine Artist Terry Allen to name but one influence. However whatever my ‘practice’ entailed throughout this period one thing remained constant. My commitment and seriousness about what I was depicting in whatever medium.

Throughout my ‘art-working’ life some things have remained stubbornly, one might even say obsessively’ constant. Be it in digital images as recently or in drawing or poetry and song I have remained constant in delineating a clearly ‘map-able’ terrain. This terrain extends about 5 to 20 miles in radius of my hometown of Didcot in Oxfordshire, England. Always the poor relation of the illustrious centre of learning that resides but a stones throw away.

There runs a hard core of intention throughout which draws on politics, ecological thinking and that obsessive returning to notions of ‘place’ and ‘landscape’. I regard my work as being a mapping of constant themes which recur sometimes years later. The River Thames is one theme the Berkshire Downs another. Local folk tales and oral literature mined from local libraries another. A recent song ‘Hanging Puppet’ drew on one such ‘tale. In fact one could describe it as artistic ‘Anglocana’ to differentiate it from Americana. I have written well over 2000 songs over the years..Mostly these are recorded in lo-fi versions and only really coming to life when in the hands of other more talented musicians (see the Moon Over the Downs CD 2003). Poetry has appeared in various magazines and in the Scottish anthology The Ice Horses (1996). I currently have at least 4 unpublished complete books of poetry on the shelf. One could describe my work as multi-disciplinary with a strong streak of green politics colouring the waters beneath.

I have drawn on some clear influences in writing and art. Seamus Heaney’s concept of a personal ‘Hedge School’ going back to John Clare is one thread. My forebear’s personal involvement in Agricultural Unions is another (see Skeleton at the Plough poems). I also am influenced by a ‘working class’ sense of writing picked up from Carver and Gallagher and other dirty realists. In song almost any Americana act would suffice. I am not American but I have strong American influences going back to Thoreau and Walden lake. To try and build an alternative ‘English’ approach I have increasingly been drawn back to the English Civil War when the notions of science and arts were more fluid and interchangeable. I have recently purchased a reproduction of Robert Plot’s Oxford a marvellous Natural History of Oxfordshire from 1677. In it one finds specimens such as ‘Stones that look like Horses’…wonderful….

It is this kind of merging of scientific natural history and folk-lore terminology that I now most interested in. Both in poetry (see Downland Ballads) and artworks (see TRACK..2009)

So how does theory inform my practice? Well I see no distinction between the various arts. I am widely read in poetry and song and that informs my practice whatever I do. At times I have also used cartooning as an ‘art criticism’ vehicle as well as penning many art review pieces. I regard both theory and practice as being essential parts of art education and indeed my own life-long learning. One would not exist without the other.

One needs time to absorb and think not just create. I return again and again to my greatest teachers. People I did not know but who showed by example. Sorley Maclean and Norman McCaig both fine Scottish poets and the female war artist Ray Howard Jones whom I had pleasure of meeting…a friend of the artist David Jones. Wonderful inspirational people…

Leverhulme bid- Proposal

Here is the sadly failed application proposal but plenty of pointers to a future PhD proposal to work with…especially in regard to the mountain of Victorian art and railway literature in my studio….
[scribd id=249245353 key=key-emjYnJ5H6G6eFq1lsuLr mode=scroll]

Patrick Keiller Bibliography

 

Patrick Keiller bibliography

Keiller, Patrick:”Imaging” in Matthew Beaumont and Gregory Dart (eds): Restless Cities (London: Verso, 2010), pp.139-154.

Keiller, Patrick: “Landscape and Cinematography”, Cultural Geographies, Vol. 16, No. 3, 2009, pp.409-414; http://cgj.sagepub.com/cgi/pdf_extract/16/3/409

Keiller, Patrick: “Popular Science” in Anthony Kiendl (ed.): Informal Architectures: Space and Contemporary Culture (London: Black Dog, 2008), pp. 32-37.

Keiller, Patrick: “Urban Space and Early Film” in Andrew Webber and Emma Wilson (eds): Cities in Transition: The Moving Image and the Modern Metropolis (London, New York: Wallflower, 2008), pp. 29-39.

Unwin, Richard: review of The City of the Future, BFI Southbank Gallery, in Frieze 114, April 2008; http://www.frieze.com/issue/review/patrick_keiller

Dillon, Brian: review of The City of the Future, BFI Southbank Gallery, London in Modern Painters, March 2008, pp.84-85.

Keiller, Patrick: “Phantom Rides: The Railway and Early Film” in Matthew Beaumont, Michael Freeman (eds): The Railway and Modernity: Time, Space, and the Machine Ensemble (Oxford etc: Peter Lang, 2008), pp.69-84.

Hanks, Robert: review of The City of the Future in The Independent Extra, 22 November 2007, pp.14-15; http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/art/reviews/a-cinematic-show-puts-a-new-twist-on-historical-perception-765004.html

Keiller, Patrick: feature article in Time Out, 21 November 2007, p.67; http://www.timeout.com/film/features/show-feature/3841/patrick-keiller-interview.html

Keiller, Patrick:”Phantom Rides”, The Guardian Review, 10 November 2007, p.14; http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2007/nov/10/2

Hardingham, Samantha and Rattenbury, Kester: Supercrit #1: Cedric Price Potteries Thinkbelt (Abingdon: Routledge 2007), pp.110-111.

Walker, Ian: So Exotic, So Homemade: Surrealism, Englishness and Documentary Photography (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2007), pp.160-186.

Keiller, Patrick: “Londres, Bombay” in Vertigo Vol. 3 No. 6 Summer 2007, pp. 38-39, 42-23.

Keiller, Patrick: “Film as Spatial Critique” in Mark Dorrian, Murray Fraser, Jonathan Hill, Jane Rendell (eds): Critical Architecture (London, New York: Routledge, 2007), pp.115-123.

Keiller, Patrick: ‘The City of the Future’ in Alan Burton, Laraine Porter (eds): Picture Perfect: Landscape, Place and Travel in British Cinema before 1930 (Exeter: Exeter University Press, 2007), pp.104-112, abridged at http://www.bftv.ac.uk/newslet/0304p3.htm

Anderson, Jason: “London Mapping: Patrick Keiller’s Peripatetic Hybrids”, interview with Patrick Keiller, Cinema Scope 26, 2006.

Keiller, Patrick:”Coal Hopper, Nine Elms Lane, ” in Iain Sinclair (ed): London: City of Disappearances (London: Hamish Hamilton, 2006), pp.292-295.

Burke, Andrew: “Nation, Landscape and Nostalgia in Patrick Keiller’s Robinson in Space”, Historical Materialism 14:1, 2006, pp.3-29; http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/brill/hm/2006/00000014/00000001

Connarty, Jane; Lanyon, Josephine and others: Ghosting: The Role of the Archive within Contemporary Artists’ Film and Video (Bristol: Picture This, 2006), pp.106-109.

Mazierska, Ewa & Rascaroli, Laura: Crossing New Europe: Postmodern Travel and the European Road Movie (London: Wallflower, 2006), pp.57-78.

Dave, Paul: Visions of England: Class and Culture in Contemporary Cinema (Oxford, New York: Berg, 2006), pp.119-140.

Making History: Art and Documentary in Britain from 1929 to Now (Liverpool: Tate Liverpool, 2006), pp.38, 46-47.

Pile, Steve: Real Cities: Modernity, Space and the Phantasmagorias of City Life (London: Sage, 2005), pp.4-12.

Keiller, Patrick: “Motion Pictures”, The Guardian Review, 21 May 2005, pp.18-19; http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2005/may/21/2

House, John & Keiller, Patrick: “River of Dreams”, Tate Etc. 3 (Spring 2005), pp.100-107; http://www.tate.org.uk/tateetc/issue3/riverofdreams.htm

Demorgon, Laurence: “Robinson, pélerin du monde global”, “Architecture d’aujourdhui“350, January-February 2005, pp.24-25.

Keiller, Patrick: “Tram Rides and Other Virtual Landscapes” in Simon Popple, Patrick Russell, Vanessa Toulmin (eds): The Lost World of Mitchell & Kenyon: Edwardian Britain on Film, (London: BFI, 2004), pp.191-200.

Mayer, Robert: “Not Adaptation but Drifting : Patrick Keiller, Daniel Defoe, and the Relationship between Film and Literature”, Eighteenth-Century Fiction 16:4, July 2004, pp.803-827; http://digitalcommons.mcmaster.ca/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1721&context=ecf

Misselwitz, Philipp: “Reichtmer im Zerfall”, interview with Patrick Keiller in Philipp Oswalt (ed): Schrumpfende Städte, (Berlin: Hatje Cantz Verlag, 2004), pp.554-559; English edition 2006, pp.554-559.

Keiller, Patrick: ‘The City of the Future’ in City 7:3, November 2003, pp.376-386.

Dillon, Brian: ‘London Calling’, interview with Patrick Keiller in Frieze 78, October 2003, pp.78-81 http://www.frieze.com/issue/article/london_calling/

O’Pray, Michael: Avant-Garde Film: Forms, Themes and Passions (London, New York: Wallflower, 2003), pp.107-118.

Keiller, Patrick: ‘London in the Early 1990s’ in Andrew Gibson and Joe Kerr (eds): London from Punk to Blair (London: Reaktion, 2003), pp.353-361 and AA Files 49: London: Postcolonial City (London: Architectural Association, 2003), pp.20-24.

Keiller, Patrick: ‘London-Rochester-London’ in Cedric Price and others: Re:CP (Basel, Boston, Berlin: Birkhäuser, 2003), pp.168-185.

O’Neill, Eithne: London and Robinson in Space review in Positif 509/510 (July/August 2003), p.138.

Keiller, Patrick: ‘The Poetic Experience of Townscape and Landscape’ and ‘Atmosphere, Palimpsest and Other Interpretations of Landscape’ reprinted in Nina Danino & Michael Mazière (eds): The Undercut Reader (London, New York: Wallflower, 2003), pp.75-83, 204-208.

Keiller, Patrick: ‘Sexual Ambiguity and Automotive Engineering’ in Peter Wollen and Joe Kerr (eds): Autopia (London: Reaktion, 2002), pp.342-353.

Evans, Gareth: The Dilapidated Dwelling review in Time Out (8-15 May 2002); http://www.timeout.com/film/reviews/65464/the-dilapidated-dwelling.html

Keiller, Patrick: ‘Architectural Cinematography’ in Kester Rattenbury (ed): This Is Not Architecture (London, New York: Routledge, 2002), pp.37-44.

Martin-Jones, David: interview with Patrick Keiller, Journal of Popular British Cinema, 5-2002, pp.123-132.

Keiller, Patrick: The Robinson Institute, eBook in series Species of Spaces for diffusion.org.uk, 2002; http://diffusion.org.uk/?p=62

Keiller, Patrick: ‘Port Statistics’ in Iain Borden, Joe Kerr, Jane Rendell, Alicia Pivaro (eds): The Unknown City (Cambridge MA, London: MIT, 2001), pp.442-458.

Eisner, Ken: The Dilapidated Dwelling review in Variety, December 18-31, 2000; http://www.variety.com/review/VE1117796949.html?categoryid=31&cs=1

Bruzzi, Stella: New Documentary: a critical introduction (London: Routledge, 2000), pp.99-123.

Dave, Paul: ‘Representations of Capitalism, History and Nation in the Work of Patrick Keiller’, in Justine Ashby and Andrew Higson (eds): British Cinema, Past and Present (London: Routledge, 2000), pp.339-351.

Smith, Claire: ‘New Art Cinema in the 90s’, in Robert Murphy (ed): British Cinema in the ’90s (London: BFI, 2000), pp.145-155.

Keiller, Patrick: ‘Popular Science’, in Landscape (London: British Council, 2000), pp.60-67.

Kerr, Joe: interview with Patrick Keiller in Bob Fear (ed): Architecture + Film II, Architectural Design, 70:1, January 2000, pp.82-85.

Keiller, Patrick: Robinson in Space and a Conversation with Patrick Wright (London: Reaktion Books, 1999).

Richard Wentworth’s Thinking Aloud (London: National Touring Exhibitions, 1998), p.33.

Keiller, Patrick: ‘The Dilapidated Dwelling’ in Sarah Wigglesworth and Jeremy Till (eds): The Everyday and Architecture, Architectural Design 68:7-8, 1998, pp.22-27.

Dave, Paul: ‘The Bourgeois Paradigm and Heritage Cinema’, New Left Review 224, July-August 1997, pp.111-126; http://www.newleftreview.org/?view=1914

Barwell, Claire: interview with Patrick Keiller, Pix 2, 1997, pp.158-165.

Sinclair, Iain: Lights Out For the Territory (London: Granta, 1997), pp.306-317.

Sorensen, Colin: interview with Patrick Keiller, London on Film (London: Museum of London, 1996), pp.160-161.

Daniels, Stephen: “Paris Envy: Patrick Keiller’s London“, History Workshop Journal, 40:1, 1995, pp.220-222; http://hwj.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/pdf_extract/40/1/220

Keiller, Patrick: ‘The Tourist Poem’, Umeni XLIII:1-2, UDU AVCR, Prague, 1995, pp.45-47.

Price, Anna: interview with Patrick Keiller, Artifice 1, 1994, pp.26-37.

Keiller, Patrick: ‘The Visible Surface’, Sight and Sound, November 1994, p.35.

Keiller, Patrick: 1994 Berlin Film Festival programme text for London, reprinted as ‘Filming London Obliquely’, Regenerating Cities 7, 1994, pp.54-55.

Sinclair, Iain: ‘Necropolis of Fretful Ghosts’, Sight and Sound, June 1994, pp.12-15.

The British Art Show 1990 (London: South Bank Centre, 1990), pp.76-77, 134.

Keiller, Patrick: ‘Modern Architecture in Czechoslovakia 1919-1939’, published as ‘Czech Perspective’, Building Design, 13 March 1987, pp.22-25.

O’Pray, Michael: review of Norwood, Monthly Film Bulletin, October 1984, pp.322-323.

Keiller, Patrick: ‘Atmosphere, Palimpsest and Other Interpretations of Landscape’, in Undercut 7-8, 1983, pp.125-129.

Keiller, Patrick: ‘The Poetic Experience of Townscape and Landscape’, in Undercut 3-4, 1982, pp.42-48.

see also:

http://www.rca.ac.uk/patrickkeiller

http://thefutureoflandscape.wordpress.com

 

The Tuning of Place

http://mitpress.mit.edu/catalog/item/default.asp?ttype=2&tid=12154

The Tuning of Place
Sociable Spaces and Pervasive Digital Media
Richard Coyne

Table of Contents and Sample Chapters

How do pervasive digital devices—smartphones,  iPods, GPS navigation systems, and cameras, among others—influence the way we use spaces? In The Tuning of Place, Richard Coyne argues that these ubiquitous devices and the networks that support them become the means of making incremental adjustments within spaces—of tuning place. Pervasive media help us formulate a sense of place, writes Coyne, through their capacity to introduce small changes, in the same way that tuning a musical instrument invokes the subtle process of recalibration. Places are inhabited spaces, populated by people, their concerns, memories, stories, conversations, encounters, and artifacts. The tuning of place—whereby people use their devices in their interactions with one another—is also a tuning of social relations.

The range of ubiquity is vast—from the familiar phones and handheld devices through RFID tags, smart badges, dynamic signage, microprocessors in cars and kitchen appliances, wearable computing, and prosthetics, to devices still in development. Rather than catalog achievements and predictions, Coyne offers a theoretical framework for discussing pervasive media that can inform developers, designers, and users as they contemplate interventions into the environment. Processes of tuning can lead to consideration of themes highly relevant to pervasive computing: intervention, calibration, wedges, habits, rhythm, tags, taps, tactics, thresholds, aggregation, noise, and interference.

About the Author

Richard Coyne is Professor and Chair of Architectural Computing, University of Edinburgh. He is the author of Designing Information Technology in the Postmodern Age: From Method to Metaphor (1995), Technoromanticism: Digital Narrative, Holism, and the Romance of the Real (2001), and Cornucopia Limited: Design and Dissent on the Internet (2005), all published by the MIT Press.

from website

http://ace.caad.ed.ac.uk/richard/

Tom Pow’s Dying Villages project

http://www.dyingvillages.com/index2.php

 

By 2030 it is estimated that Europe will have lost one third of its population. It is already an ageing population with a low birthrate. The effect of this demographic change – the greatest since the Black Death – will be felt most acutely in rural areas. In 2007,  I received a Creative Scotland Award from the Scottish Arts Council for a project aimed at responding in poetry and prose to the social, ecological and cultural effects of demographic changes on villages in Europe.

In 2007 and 2008,  I made trips to affected areas in Spain, France, Germany, Poland, Bulgaria, Russia and Greece. The Dying Village website reflects these trips in sound, image, interviews and artworks.

Dying Villages is an ongoing project. Related works of poetry and prose will appear elsewhere.

Tom Pow

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